About

Victor Nee is the Frank and Rosa Rhodes Professor in the Department of Sociology at Cornell and the Director of the Economic Sociology Lab.

Nee’s current research interests in economic sociology examine the role of networks and norms in the emergence of economic institutions and or Nee’s current research interests in economic sociology examine the role of networks and norms in the emergence and effects of economic institutions and organizations.

Nee has a research program on the making of knowledge-based regional economies in the United States. The study examines the rise of a 21st century regional knowledge economy in New York City and Los Angeles. The study uses a mixed methods approach of big data, survey research and ethnographic field research.

He is also working on an ongoing study of institutional change focusing on networks and norms of entrepreneurs and firms in the Yangzi delta region of China.

He has started a new research project on the sources of great wealth using cross-national data.

In April, 2020 Victor Nee was elected to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences—one of 276 newly elected fellows honored for individual achievements in academia, the arts, business, government and public affairs.

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Work

Research

The Economic Sociology Lab

The Economic Sociology Lab seeks to provide training in theory construction linked to empirical research.

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The Making of New York City’s Tech Economy

An investigation of the rapid growth of tech start-ups in NYC during a period of severe economic recession.

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Books

Articles & Chapters

Immigration, Opportunity and Assimilation in a Technology Economy (Victor Nee and Lucas Drouhot), CSES Working Paper Series, Center for the Study of Economy & Society Cornell University, 2020

Learning to Trust: From Relational Exchange to Generalized Trust in China (Victor Nee, Håkan J. Holm, Sonja Opper) Informs 2019

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Videos

Economic sociology is a science concerning itself with the interpretive understanding of social economic action and thereby with a causal explanation of its course and consequences.

—Max Weber